Arrested For Being
Socially Dangerous

On 19th December 1939 I was arrested by the NKVD (below is a copy of the arrest details held on the Memorial website created from NKVD records)

My Arrest Charge

Get Relatives USSR Apology 05© www.swoopingeagle.com

This translates to Polish as:

  • Gostik Vladimir Aleksandrovich
  • Rodilsja v 1908 g., g. Belostok; belorus; obrazovanie nachal'noe; b/p; bez opred.zanjatij. Prozhival: g. Belostok.
  • Arestovan 19 dekabrja 1939 g.
  • Prigovoren: OSO 27 ijunja 1940 g., obv.: 74 UK BSSR - social'no opasnyj jelement.
  • Prigovor: 8 let ITL, otbyv.: Arhangel'skaja obl., osvob. 05.09.41 Reabilitirovan 19 ijunja 1989 g. Prokuror Grodnenskoj obl.
  • Istochnik: Belorusskij "Memorial"

The Arrest Details (In English)

  • Gostik Vladimir Alexandrovich
  • Born in 1908, in Bialystok
  • Belarusian
  • Primary education; b / p; without a definition
  • Lived: Białystok
  • He was arrested on December 19, 1939
  • Sentenced: CCA on June 27, 1940
  • obv .: 74 of the Criminal Code of the BSSR is a socially dangerous element
  • Sentence: 8 years IT
  • Departure: Arkhangelsk region, excavation. 05.09.41
  • Rehabilitated on June 19, 1989
  • The prosecutor of the Grodno region
  • Source: Belarusian "Memorial"

Russian Name Change

At this point you might be wondering how and why my name changed.

The Russian name Gostik Vladimir Alexandrovich came about by them swapping Wladyslaw (A polish name) to it's closest Russian equivalent, "Vladimir". My fathers name, Aleksander, was then added in front of it but with the Russian equivalent of "Alexandrovich".

To take things one step further on some Russian documents they even made the name Vladimir more Russian by calling me Wlodzimierz Gostik.

Some might say that the Russians replaced everything with Russian including names. In this way we started to lose our identity as a nation.

Editors Note: Włodzimierz is a Polish variant of the Slavic name Vladimir (See here)

How I Became "Socially Dangerous"

The Soviets decided that I was "socially dangerous" because I was outspoken about Bolshevism. I did not agree with Stalins ideals, neither did any sane Polish person and so to be charged as "socially dangerous" simply meant that it was not good to have me in the community because I would not yield to Stalin but rather speak out against him thus weakening Stalins stranglehold on Poland.